Balancing Building with the Bush (Opinion)

The Truckee River in downtown Reno. Image: Bob Conrad.
The Truckee River in downtown Reno. Image: Bob Conrad.

Submitted opinion by Brian Bonnenfant

As our region continues to prosper from game-changing investments that are diversifying and strengthening our economy, we cannot ignore the impacts on the region’s quality of life.  Arguably one of our region’s best assets is our open spaces that invite recreation of all sorts while balancing the protection of sensitive habitat.  As we grow and develop, we must also contribute energy and efforts into preserving open space and sensitive lands.

As our region continues to prosper from game-changing investments that are diversifying and strengthening our economy, we cannot ignore the impacts on the region’s quality of life. Arguably one of our region’s best assets is our open spaces that invite recreation of all sorts while balancing the protection of sensitive habitat.  As we grow and develop, we must also contribute energy and efforts into preserving open space and sensitive lands.

The two, development and land preservation, can work hand-in-hand.  Without either, our region will become unattractive to future generations and businesses.

Luckily for the region, there are several organizations striving to protect sensitive lands, including the Nevada Land Trust.  Nevada Land Trust, based in Reno, has helped conserve over 46,000 acres of land and associated water rights since 1998.  Notable recent accomplishments are leading land acquisitions at Jobs Peak (Douglas County), in Ash Canyon (Carson City), and along the Incline Flume Trail, as well as helping with the conservation easement on the Ascuaga’s Jacks Valley Ranch. 

Nevada Land Trust was also instrumental with Keep Truckee Meadows Beautiful in the initiation of One Truckee River that is currently finessing a blueprint for protecting our often ignored jewel that attracts tourists while providing family respite and recreation (Truckee River is also used to highlight the region by economic entities like RSCVA and EDAWN).

Here is where you are needed.  Nevada Land Trust is a non-profit organization that survives on a variety of support mechanisms.  NLT’s primary fund-raising event is the annual Banff Mountain Film Festival which will be held at the Reno Ballroom on Thursday, April 4th (7:00-9:30 pm).  The Banff Mountain Film Festival, a collection of award-winning outdoor adventure films, represents an important opportunity to raise imperative funds for future land protection efforts by Nevada Land Trust through ticket sales and industry and entity sponsorships.

To protect and enhance our majestic outdoors that provide quantifiable and qualitative economic impacts to the region, I am personally asking you to support the Nevada Land Trust by attending or sponsoring the Banff Film Festival.  Your ticket purchase or sponsorship, much of which is tax-deductible, will send a loud message to the 1,200 attendees (sells out every year) that your entity also cherishes recreation, the outdoors, and the future of our community.

For further sponsorship information or purchase of tickets, please contact Melissa at 775-379-8816 ([email protected]).


About Brian Bonnenfant

Brian is the Project Manager for the Center for Regional Studies where he has conducted a wide variety of mapping and analyses at the University of Nevada, Reno since 1994. He is also an officer of the Nevada Land Trust

About Brian Bonnenfant
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