Home > Entertainment > ENTERTAINMENT: Locals reach for the stars with podcast, benefit video, new music app

ENTERTAINMENT: Locals reach for the stars with podcast, benefit video, new music app

By Bob Conrad

Reno’s Alex Boykins has a new podcast, and it’s in the running to be named “Next Great Podcast 2021” by iHeart Radio.

“We’re changing lives,” Boykins said at the beginning of her pilot episode of her Mending Fences podcast. Spoilers will not be made here, but getting people together is part of the podcast’s mission.

Boykins’ podcast is described by Tongal, which is helping promote new podcasts for the iHeart Radio competition, like this:

On every episode of her moving new podcast, Alex embarks on an emotional journey in an attempt to reconcile friends and family who have fallen out. We love the heartfelt look at the complexities of human relationships, the effort to bring closure and healing to both parties, and the emphasis on exploring friendships, why they end, and how those endings impact our lives.”

Listen to the pilot episode here, and vote for Mending Fences here. Voting ends Dec. 15.

Tribute tune benefits school music program

Reno recording veteran Tom Gordon has produced a video and recording of Rush’s “Battle Scar” and proceeds from the single will benefit the American Indian Graduate Center and the Washoe County School District Music Education Program.

The song was recorded with local musicians “putting their art in service to make positive change in our community… and it elicits the best of this giving season. The music and the video, full of powerful imagery, can help localize and energize northern Nevada’s giving spirit,” Gordon said.

“Battle Scar” is a protest song in honor of Indigenous Americans. Watch the video here and visit the project’s Facebook page. Donate and purchase the song here.

Tonic Audio seeks to improve music collaboration 

Local startup Tonic Audio wants people to make music together more efficiently. The company’s Ethan Clift said the platform allows users to ditch messy folders, lost messages and email links so that musicians can share music easily and safely. 

The platform, which is free but costs $7.50/month for more features, is browser-based so no downloads are necessary. The idea is to coordinate file sharing allowing users “to upload files, give feedback and collaborate all in one place.”

The company this week announced it has a new advisor: Alex Coronfly. Coronfly has 20 years experience with some of the world’s top major labels. 

“We see the problems musicians face from one angle; Alex sees them from an entirely different perspective–one that could only come from an industry veteran,” Clift said.