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Pinwheels planted to raise awareness about child abuse, neglect

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The Children’s Services Division of the Washoe County Human Services Agency is raising awareness this month about child abuse and neglect by planting pinwheels outside public buildings.

April is National Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Month.

Hundreds of pinwheels, which represent the joyful and carefree childhood children deserve, are outside various Washoe County buildings, including the Administration Building, 1001 E. Ninth St.; Human Services Agency, 350 S. Center St.; and the District Attorney’s Office – Child Advocacy Center, 2097 Longley Lane.

“It’s incumbent upon us all to make sure Washoe County’s children are safe and secure,” HSA Children’s Services Division Director Ryan Gustafson said in a statement. “We hope this month highlights the importance of protecting our children, raises awareness about child abuse, and helps families in need of guidance, support and recovery.”

HSA received 6,074 reports of child abuse and/or neglect and reunified 236 children with their families during the 2020 fiscal year, according to the county.

HSA asks the public to be vigilant and to call 833-900-SAFE when reporting child abuse and/or neglect and invites the public to join it by choosing one day in April to wear blue.

If people wish to upload photos of themselves onto social media in blue attire or with pinwheels, they’re asked to use #Pinwheels4Prevention when posting.

Carla O'Day
Carla O'Day
Carla has an undergraduate degree in journalism and more than 10 years experience as a daily newspaper reporter. She grew up in Jacksonville, Fla., moved to the Reno area in 2002 and wrote for the Reno Gazette-Journal for 8 years, covering a variety of topics. Prior to that, she covered local government in Fort Pierce, Fla.

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