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Regents extend chancellor, UNR president contracts 6 months

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University of Nevada, Reno President Marc Johnson, who planned to step down this summer and join the faculty, had his contract extended through December by the Board of Regents.

Nevada System of Higher Education Chancellor Thomas Reilly also had his contract extended last week through the end of the calendar year, as did University of Nevada, Las Vegas acting president Marta Meana, who isn’t seeking permanent appointment to the post.

Searches had been postponed due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

“I appreciate the sacrifice President Meana and President Johnson are making to allow for continuity and an easy transition during this disruptive event,” Reilly said in a statement.

The searches for the permanent presidents of UNR and UNLV are scheduled to take place in September, and will include campus visits, meetings and interviews with the search committee and various university and community stakeholders for the finalists.

The search to replace Reilly, who isn’t seeking a contract extension when his three-year commitment expires this summer, is scheduled for June. Once a permanent chancellor is found, Reilly will serve in an advisory role.

Prospective candidates are scheduled to visit UNR Sept. 14 and 15. Finalist interviews would then follow Sept. 16, with the Regents making a decision on Sept. 17.


Carla O'Day
Carla O'Day
Carla has an undergraduate degree in journalism and more than 10 years experience as a daily newspaper reporter. She grew up in Jacksonville, Fla., moved to the Reno area in 2002 and wrote for the Reno Gazette-Journal for 8 years, covering a variety of topics. Prior to that, she covered local government in Fort Pierce, Fla.

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