PHOTOS: Hoover Dam May Be Best Seen From Below

Hoover Dam - Ty ONeil (17 of 127)
Hoover Dam - Ty ONeil (18 of 127)
Hoover Dam - Ty ONeil (19 of 127)
Hoover Dam - Ty ONeil (20 of 127)
Hoover Dam - Ty ONeil (21 of 127)
Hoover Dam - Ty ONeil (22 of 127)
Hoover Dam - Ty ONeil (23 of 127)
Hoover Dam - Ty ONeil (24 of 127)
Hoover Dam - Ty ONeil (25 of 127)
Hoover Dam - Ty ONeil (26 of 127)
Hoover Dam - Ty ONeil (27 of 127)
Hoover Dam - Ty ONeil (28 of 127)
Hoover Dam - Ty ONeil (29 of 127)
Hoover Dam - Ty ONeil (30 of 127)
Hoover Dam - Ty ONeil (31 of 127)
Hoover Dam - Ty ONeil (32 of 127)
Hoover Dam - Ty ONeil (33 of 127)
Hoover Dam - Ty ONeil (34 of 127)
Hoover Dam - Ty ONeil (35 of 127)
Hoover Dam - Ty ONeil (36 of 127)
Hoover Dam - Ty ONeil (37 of 127)
Hoover Dam - Ty ONeil (38 of 127)
Hoover Dam - Ty ONeil (39 of 127)
Hoover Dam - Ty ONeil (40 of 127)
Hoover Dam - Ty ONeil (41 of 127)
Hoover Dam - Ty ONeil (42 of 127)
Hoover Dam - Ty ONeil (43 of 127)
Hoover Dam - Ty ONeil (44 of 127)
Hoover Dam - Ty ONeil (45 of 127)
Hoover Dam - Ty ONeil (46 of 127)
Hoover Dam - Ty ONeil (47 of 127)
Hoover Dam - Ty ONeil (48 of 127)
Hoover Dam - Ty ONeil (49 of 127)
Hoover Dam - Ty ONeil (50 of 127)
Hoover Dam - Ty ONeil (51 of 127)

If you plan a trip to the Hoover Dam you may want to add a tour to your itinerary. While being on the dam itself is an experience, seeing the massive feat of engineering might be best witnessed from below.

While the very base of the dam is restricted, The Hoover Dam Tour Company has the ability to pass through restricted gates and security checks to take its guests on rafts directly below the dam. From this vantage point the mass of concrete stretches ever upward. Tiny dots at the very top of the dam, upon closer inspection, are the silhouettes of people revealing the almost unbelievable size of the dam.

For the photographers, from casual smartphones users to dedicated lifelong photographers, you are almost guaranteed some amazing images. The tour uses large very stable rafts allowing for a relaxed environment that is easily photographed.

Tour guides are also deeply knowledgeable of the Hoover Dam and have the ability to show guests historical points that would be impossible to see anywhere but from their rafts.

For more information on tours visit http://www.blackcanyonadventures.com/ .

ThisisReno contributors Kyle Young (l) and Ty O'Neil (r), and Nevada Magazine editor Meg Mueller (center).
ThisisReno contributors Kyle Young (l) and Ty O’Neil (r), and Nevada Magazine editor Meg Mueller (center). Image: Ty O’Neil

A few photo tips for those who are interested:

  1. If you have interchangeable lenses, take a zoom lens. While you will be using a wide angle a lot, there will be plenty of use for your zoom lens as well, including wildlife and detail shots.
  2. Remember to take panoramic images. If you have a smart phone this is probably built in as an option. If you’re using a DSLR, take images to stitch together later. It’s absolutely worth the effort.
  3. Don’t be too shy. These tour guides want you to have a good experience and will do what they can to help you get an image you want. Just remember to be reasonable in your requests.
  4. Lastly, remember to get a photo of yourself at the bottom of the dam. I know this sounds silly but it’s easy to get caught up in the scenery and forget to get an image of yourself.
Ty O'Neil
About Ty O'Neil 193 Articles
Ty O’Neil is a lifelong student of anthropology with two degrees in the arts. He is far more at home in the tear gas filled streets of war torn countries than he is relaxing at home. He has found a place at ThisisReno as a photojournalist. He hopes to someday be a conflict photojournalist covering wars and natural disasters abroad