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Genevieve Kaplan, Jared Stanley to give reading at Sundance

By ThisIsReno

SUNDANCE NEWS RELEASE

What: Sundance Books and Music will host a poetry reading for Genevieve Kaplan and local poet Jared Stanley. Kaplan will read from her new book In the Ice House (Red Hen Press), and Stanley will read from Book Made of Forest (Salt Publishing).

Where: Sundance Books and Music, 121 California Ave., Reno.

When: Friday, March 16, 6:30 – 8 p.m.

About the poets
Genevieve Kaplan is a graduate of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop. Her book of poetry In the Ice House won the 2009 A Room of Her Own Foundation To the Lighthouse poetry prize and was published in 2011 by Red Hen Press. She’s currently completing her Ph.D. in literature and creative writing at the University of Southern California. Her poems, essays and reviews have appeared in a variety of journals, including Western Humanities Review, Terrain.org: A journal of the built and natural environments, Front Porch and Jubilat.

Jared Stanley is the author of two collections of poetry, Book Made of Forest and the forthcoming The Weeds, both from Salt Publishing. He co-edits the magazine Mrs. Maybe and is a member of the art collective Unmanned Minerals. His recent work has appeared in OnandOnScreen, Precipitate: a Journal of the New Environmental Imagination, Ping*Pong: The Journal of the Henry Miller Library and Badlands. He lives in Reno.

About the books
Kaplan’s In the Ice House offers an innovative meditation on domestic life and the physical world that surrounds it, chronicling “at least the beginnings of some disaster” taking place in a landscape that “had no symmetry.” Her poems reveal an atmospheric and wondrous world filled with odd and compelling images. Moving artfully between internal desires and incisive observations of the external, these stunning poems radiate with both heat and ice.

Stanley’s Book Made of Forest comprises lyrics, mock journal entries, prose portraits and odes. It answers the “summons and challenge” of being both human and animal, urban and rural, cultured and philistine, formal and ruinous, willful and acted-upon. Stanley strikes at the absurd thingness of things, rings out their histories, traces their loss in the sixth extinction and figures his voluminous overhearing into poems rhetorical and fragmented, mournful and comedic.

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