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Funding available to restore lands impacted by 2011 wildfires

Date:

NRCS NEWS RELEASE

The USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service is offering funding to agricultural producers to restore land impacted by the 2011 wildfires.  Bruce Petersen, Nevada state conservationist, announced that the NRCS is offering funding under the Environmental Quality Incentives Program for ranchers and farmers to apply necessary conservation practices on lands damaged by fires.

“We need to act now to repair the land damaged by the wildfires,” Petersen said.  He stated that the 2011 fires severely impacted lands that provide critical habitat for several wildlife species of concern including sage-grouse, and negatively impacted livestock grazing operations dependent on these areas for forage.

Eligible conservation practices may include erosion control structures, rangeland seeding, fencing to protect sensitive areas and grazing management.

Farmers and ranchers must meet EQIP eligibility requirements.  Private and public lands may be enrolled into the program.  Applicants are encouraged to apply by November 18 to be considered for this year’s funding cycle.

Payment rates for practices are based on a percentage, usually 75 percent, of the typical costs for installation of the practices.   Beginning, limited resource and socially disadvantaged producers may be eligible for higher payment rates not to exceed 90 percent.

NRCS will coordinate treatment alternatives and activities with public land management agencies for applicants who include public lands.

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