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Opinion: Harry Reid hiding on Arizona lawsuit

By ThisIsReno

SUBMITTED RELEASE

While President Barack Obama is using his Justice Department to prevent Arizona from securing its border with Mexico, Majority Leader Harry Reid remains silent, refusing to take a position.

“Harry Reid is too afraid to publicly support this outrageous action by President Obama and his Justice Department–a move disapproved of by 57 percent of Nevada voters–so he’s refusing to take a position. That’s not leadership, and the people of Nevada deserve better,” said Jerry Stacy, a spokesman for U.S. Senatorial candidate Sharron Angle.

Reid has remained silent even as other Nevada Democrats have criticized the Obama administration for suing Arizona’s attempt to secure the border. According to the Las Vegas Review-Journal, Rep. Dina Titus also questioned the suit, saying it would do little to solve the root problems of immigration.

“What the government should be spending its time and energy on is enforcing existing federal laws and fixing our broken immigration system through comprehensive reform with border security as its cornerstone,” Titus said.

“Sharron Angle openly stands with Arizona against Obama’s overreach, but Reid’s plan is to hide his position until after election day, at which point he can get back to work with President Obama, weakening our immigration laws and keeping our border unsecured. This is just another reason Harry Reid has got to go,” said Stacy.

The real Reid record on illegal immigration

Reid Called A House Plan “Un-American” That Called For Additional Border Security And Making It A Felony To Enter The Country Illegally. “The Senate Judiciary Committee has been developing a plan along the lines of what Reid discussed, with a combination of tighter enforcement, a guest-worker plan and legalization for those already here. The more conservative House, on the other hand, approved a measure in December that is enforcement-based, calling for 700 miles of additional border fencing and making it a felony to enter the country illegally, an act that is now a civil offense. Reid called the House measure ‘punitive, unfair and un-American,’ and said he believed a bill introduced last year by Senators John McCain, R.-Ariz., and Edward Kennedy, D-Mass., provided a better place to start.” (Leslie Berestein, “Senate Democrat Visits The Border,” San Diego Union Tribune, 3/23/06)

In The 2007 Immigration Bill, Reid Opposed Amendments That Would Have Strengthened The Legislation

Reid Voted In Favor Of Killing An Amendment Requiring Illegal Immigrants’ Return To Their Country Within Two Years Of Registration Before Finalizing A Z Visa Application. “Reid, D-Nev., motion to table (kill) Division I of the Kennedy, D-Mass., amendment no. 1934 that would require illegal immigrants to return to their country of origin within two years of registration for probationary status before finalizing the Z visa application.” (S. 1639, CQ Vote #229, Motion Agreed To 53-45: R 8-40; D 43-5; I 2-0, 6/27/07, Reid voted yea)

Reid Voted Against Allowing Information On Z Visa Applicants To Be Disclosed To Law Enforcement. Immigration Overhaul–Confidentiality Removal For Z Visa Applicants. “Cornyn, R-Texas, amendment no. 1250 to the Kennedy, D-Mass., substitute amendment no. 1150. The Cornyn amendment would require certain information on Z visa applicants to be disclosed to law enforcement. Such visas would allow illegal immigrants now in the country to be put on a path to citizenship. The substitute would overhaul U.S. immigration policies and institute new border security measures, including an electronic verification system. It would allocate some green cards on a merit-based system based on certain criteria, including a high-demand occupation, proficiency in English, and higher education degrees. Half of the green cards would be allocated based on family relations. It also would provide for a temporary guest worker program that would allow workers to remain in the United States for up to six years, provided that they return to their home country for a year after every two years they remain in the United States.” (S. 1348, CQ Vote #190: Adopted 57-39: R 46-2; D 11-35; I 0-2, 6/6/07, Reid voted nay)

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